Shaw’s history is that of D.C.’s center of Black economic, cultural, and social activity. The neighborhood began as a freed person’s encampment and grew to become D.C.’s “Black Broadway” that pre-dates the Harlem Renaissance. Shaw experienced a dramatic decay after the 1968 riots and an equally dramatic gentrification that started with the construction of D.C.’s Convention Center and continued post-Great Recession. It’s location proximate to downtown D.C. and cultural history has led to a real estate boom that is sometimes an awkward and inequitable representation of Shaw’s past and present.

Get informed on neighborhood development, provide your feedback, learn what the neighbors are saying.

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Engage: tell us about your neighborhood

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What connects you to Shaw?


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  • What three words best describe Washington, D.C.?

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  • The best and worst development trends in D.C. are:

Projects: stay updated on progress

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1126 9th Street NW

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1512 6th Street NW

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1612-1616 7th St NW

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801N

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Blagden Alley Micro-units

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Grimke School redevelopment

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P Street Residences

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Residences at City Market

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The Adora

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The Ellis

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The Perla

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The Shaw at Ellington Plaza

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The Wren

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Information: get a broader picture of neighborhood changes

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Developer Seeks to Rezone DC’s Grimke School Site for Redevelopment

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The 974 Units Slated for Shaw

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In The Works: Top 3 Developments Coming to U Street/Shaw

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